NETS AND DANCE: What can we learn from nature and art?

In the Barry Onouye architectural studio at the University of Washington, we are exploring how nets can be imagined and built for visual expression.  In my previous post, we discussed the mechanics of nets and exemplified their behavior with nets that we use in daily applications.  In this post, we turn our attention to how net can be topologically classified and how we see those … Continue reading NETS AND DANCE: What can we learn from nature and art?

NETS AND DANCE: What do you know about nets?

In 2015 I received a phone call from Khalid Addi, professor at the University of Reunion, one of the islands in the Indian Ocean. This french island in the Indian Ocean, attracts surfers from all over the world to test their “surf”. In 2011 the first shark attacks started, officials closed beaches and the island’s tourism-based economy largely suffered. In the wave break zones of … Continue reading NETS AND DANCE: What do you know about nets?

Pier Luigi Nervi in the world: Italy, UK and Kuwait

This is my last post that reflects upon the works of Pier Luigi Nervi. This post is based on a book chapter that a senior student Mariam Wahed and I wrote . You might also be interested in my other posts written about Nervi and his works in Italy and the United States of America. I apologise for the quality of some of the images … Continue reading Pier Luigi Nervi in the world: Italy, UK and Kuwait

Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy (part 2): cantilevering stadium roofs

This blog post is based on a manuscript I wrote with my colleague and friend Prof. David Billington.  If you are interested in finding out more about Prof. Billington and his thoughts on Pier Luigi Nervi, you might want to sign-up for this amazing free on-line course “The Art of Structural Engineering” , given by Prof. Maria Garlock. You might also be interested in my … Continue reading Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy (part 2): cantilevering stadium roofs

Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy (part 1): his ribbed floor slab systems

Happy New Year to you all! I am on my way to Roma Tre University (Rome, Italy) to present our work on biomimetic morphing forms and participate in workshop on Hygroscapes. This year I have some very exciting and innovative projects ligned up which I will tell you about in my next posts. No better way to start the year than to write a post … Continue reading Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy (part 1): his ribbed floor slab systems

Pier Luigi Nervi in America (part 2) – Norfolk

To commemorate Prof. David Billington, I feature a series of posts about the works of Pier Luigi Nervi. In the previous I wrote about the Thompson Area and the Leverone Field House projects in Hanover, USA. In this post I write about his work in USA where he did not have total control over the construction process. This post is based on a paper I … Continue reading Pier Luigi Nervi in America (part 2) – Norfolk

Out of his shell: Giorgio Baroni, an early designer of hyperbolic paraboloid shells

Martina Russo is a PhD student at Sapienza University of Rome, and recent Visiting Research Student Collaborator at Princeton University (Form Finding Lab, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Chaos Lab at the Andlinger Center for Energy and Environment). Reinforced concrete thin shell structures are nowadays considered as part of the architectural and engineering heritage of the 20th Century. Today, a number of these structures … Continue reading Out of his shell: Giorgio Baroni, an early designer of hyperbolic paraboloid shells

Staying Dry: Numerical modeling of flexible pressurized storm surge barriers

This week on the blog, we look at an analysis method of an alternate form of coastal protection: The inflatable membrane barrier. This flexible barrier can dissipate the energy of the oncoming storm surge but poses analysis challenges such as the need to consider fluid/structure interaction. Continue reading Staying Dry: Numerical modeling of flexible pressurized storm surge barriers

Let’s have R-Fun

  The solution to this Latin anagram published by Robert Hooke (1635-1703) is the following “Ut pendet continuum flexile, sic stabit contiguum rigidum inversum”, the translation is “As hang the flexible line, so but inverted will stand the rigid arch”. The concept is simple: in order to obtain an arch that acts in pure compression, the shape of the equivalent hanging chain needs to be … Continue reading Let’s have R-Fun