Shaken but overlooked: efficiency, economy and elegance in earthquake-prone areas

Are structures outside of the Euro-American canon being overlooked when we discuss structural art? In an essay that was selected as one of three finalist submissions for the 2018 SOM Structural Engineering Travel Fellowship, Tim Michiels argues through examples from Japan and Mexico, that extraordinary structures built in earthquake-prone areas do not always receive the attention they deserve. 1. Celebrated structural art is underrepresented in … Continue reading Shaken but overlooked: efficiency, economy and elegance in earthquake-prone areas

Reporting from IASS 2017 – Severe Conditions & Disasters

Last week at the IASS the Form Finding Lab was very involved in the session on severe conditions & disasters. The session was chaired by our own Sigrid Adriaenssens and close collaborator Prof. Ruy Marcelo Pauletti from the University of Sao Paulo, and many more collaborators presented their research. The revue of familiar faces started with Eftychia Dichorou from the University of Cambridge. Dichorou presented … Continue reading Reporting from IASS 2017 – Severe Conditions & Disasters

How to form find shells that withstand earthquakes? We asked Tim Michiels who was just awarded the prestigious Hangai Prize.

Yesterday our PhD Candidate Tim Michiels was awarded the Hangai prize for his “Outstanding paper by a young talented researcher under 30”  at the annual symposium of the International Association of Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS) in Hamburg. Tim presented his research titled “Parametric study of masonry shells form found for seismic loading”  during the plenary session on Tuesday. Tim’s award marks the 3rd consecutive  … Continue reading How to form find shells that withstand earthquakes? We asked Tim Michiels who was just awarded the prestigious Hangai Prize.

Design-and-build bamboo shells

Bamboo is a building material that lends itself excellently to the construction of sustainable gridshells. Two of the Form Finding Lab’s graduating senior students, Lu Lu and Russell Archer (’16), worked under the guidance of PhD candidate Tim Michiels and Professor Adriaenssens on the analysis of a set of hyperbolic paraboloid (hypar) gridshell roofs in Cali, Colombia. The Form Finding Lab’s team collaborated closely with … Continue reading Design-and-build bamboo shells

Happy (rammed) earth day!

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(image credit: Pat Dumas, flickr)

In celebration of earth day, we want to show you the explorations of earth construction at the Form Finding Lab, in particular our focus on rammed earth. Rammed earth buildings are constructed by pouring soil into a form work, similar to the one used to make concrete elements. This soil is then compacted in successive layers, either by hand or using tampers to create highly compacted dirt walls like those in the Tuscon Mountain house.

Rick Joy House
Rammed earth walls at the Tucson Mountain House designed by Architect Rick Joy (photo credit: designmilk – flickr)

For his senior thesis, Aaron Katz (’16) studied rammed earth buildings and the earthquake loading capacity of rammed earth walls.  His research project evaluated the application of limit state analysis developed for masonry to assess the overturning of rammed earth walls during earthquakes.

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Form exploration of shells in seismic areas

News broadcasts showing images of collapsed buildings, ravaged roads and torn-apart cities regularly remind us about the destructive power of earthquakes. While decades of research have greatly improved the understanding of these cataclysmic events, building professionals and researchers continuously try to adapt and employ the most sophisticated numerical methods to improve the behavior of buildings during a seismic event in order to safeguard their occupants.

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Las Manantiales Restaurant in Mexico City, a concrete shell designed by Félix Candela that behaved excellently during the 1985 Mexico City earthquake. (Image courtesy Félix and Dorothy Candela Archive, Princeton University)

Researchers at the Form-Finding Lab of Princeton University (http://formfindinglab.princeton.edu/) are exploring the design of elegant and expressive structures that can safely be employed in seismic areas. They focus on shell structures, which are very thin, curved and typically large span structures made out of wide range of materials going from steel and glass, to concrete and even bricks or mud.

Continue reading “Form exploration of shells in seismic areas”