Double helix of masonry—we uncover the secret of Italian renaissance domes

The construction of the Florentine duomo by Filippo Brunelleschi has been an engineering marvel for more than 500 years, showcasing ancient techniques that still hold valuable insights for modern engineering. Until now, it has remained a mystery how the master goldsmith and sculptor managed to build the masterpiece that pushes the limits of what is possible to construct even with modern building technologies, and how the masters … Continue reading Double helix of masonry—we uncover the secret of Italian renaissance domes

What I am thinking: movie maker and masonry specialist Emil Adiels

Emil Adiels is a researcher and lecturer and a part of the Architecture and Engineering Research Group at Chalmers University of Technology of Sweden. His research focus is gravitational structures and masonry with respect to geometry, structural mechanics and production methods. What fewer people know is that Emil is also an amazing movie maker. Sigrid Adriaenssens: why do you make movies about structures? Emil Adiels: … Continue reading What I am thinking: movie maker and masonry specialist Emil Adiels

Reporting from IASS 2017 – Severe Conditions & Disasters

Last week at the IASS the Form Finding Lab was very involved in the session on severe conditions & disasters. The session was chaired by our own Sigrid Adriaenssens and close collaborator Prof. Ruy Marcelo Pauletti from the University of Sao Paulo, and many more collaborators presented their research. The revue of familiar faces started with Eftychia Dichorou from the University of Cambridge. Dichorou presented … Continue reading Reporting from IASS 2017 – Severe Conditions & Disasters

How to form find shells that withstand earthquakes? We asked Tim Michiels who was just awarded the prestigious Hangai Prize.

Yesterday our PhD Candidate Tim Michiels was awarded the Hangai prize for his “Outstanding paper by a young talented researcher under 30”  at the annual symposium of the International Association of Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS) in Hamburg. Tim presented his research titled “Parametric study of masonry shells form found for seismic loading”  during the plenary session on Tuesday. Tim’s award marks the 3rd consecutive  … Continue reading How to form find shells that withstand earthquakes? We asked Tim Michiels who was just awarded the prestigious Hangai Prize.

Assessing the Stability of Masonry Structures (part 2): Numerical and Physical Modeling

QUICK UPDATE:  Demi just had her paper published ‘Assessing the Stability of Unreinforced Masonry Arches and Vaults: A Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Strategies’, in the Journal of Architectural Heritage.  You can find it here

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This post is second in a series covering different assessment methods for stability of masonry structures. Part 1 covered classical and equilibrium methods; this post covers suitable numerical modeling techniques as well as different examples of physical modeling for masonry stability.

4. Numerical modeling

Several methods of numerical modeling for masonry structures exist, as demonstrated by the flowchart in Fig. 10.

numericalflowchart
Figure 10: Overview of numerical modeling methods for masonry structures, adapted from [41] with [8]
As the first level of Fig. 10 suggests, numerical modeling of masonry structures can be divided into four main categories: macro-modeling, homogenized modeling, simplified micro-modeling, and detailed micro-modeling. Asteris et al. [41] provide discussions, summarized below with some additions where noted, on the differences between these modeling approaches. Fig. 11 also depicts the different numerical modeling approaches. In this section, macro-modeling and simplified micro-modeling are the focus.

modelingstrategies
Figure 11: Illustration of different strategies for modeling true masonry sample (a): (b) one-phase macro-modeling, (c) two-phase micro-modeling, and (d) three-phase micro-modeling [41]

4.1 Macro-modeling: masonry as a one-phase material

The macro-modeling approach models both bricks and mortar (or all bricks, in the case of dry masonry) as a homogeneous continuum as in Fig. 11(b). As the subsets under macro-modeling in Fig. 10 suggest, these numerical models are typically finite element models.

Continue reading “Assessing the Stability of Masonry Structures (part 2): Numerical and Physical Modeling”

What to see when visiting Cambridge, UK

Our Princeton alum, Anjali Mehrotra, is currently pursuing a PhD in historic masonry structures at the University of Cambridge, UK. We asked Anjali to take us on a campus tour in search of structural surfaces. This is what she showed us. There is an abundance of vaulted structures in Cambridge, including the main gates of Corpus Christi College, Trinity College and St John’s College, which … Continue reading What to see when visiting Cambridge, UK